Dianne Brown-Green

The Journey

Artist Statement

My mask is made of hand painted monarchs on handmade/ pressed milkweed pulp paper, the one and only plant monarchs need to survive. Included in the paper is forgetmeknotts flowers to represent those we have lost to the virus so they are not forgotten . Blue beads on the outer edges the sky and waters of which the Monarch flys through and over as they journey across the globe. Green beads are milkweed and creamy White are eggs. They represent strength and endurance traveling thousands of miles during their annual migration every year to only reproduce a generation to return home in time to celebrate souls and spirits of the dead. Their metamorphoses from egg, caterpillar and chrysalis to once again emerge into a beautiful butterfly. They face many challenges during their journey, weather conditions, pesticides, insects that eat their only food source to survive and predators. They remind of the current situation in the world, the challenges and changes we are all making. Other insects that eat the one plant they need to survive is parallel to the early stages of hoarding necessities instead of only taking what we need and thinking of others. Their final stage of emerging into a butterfly which is like looking after our Elders for future generations we can learn so much from them to be kind to one another as we all share one planet. I have met many friends from around the world as we have followed their journey. I feel we are on a journey much like theirs one filled with uncertainty, changes and challenges that join us all together. We need to be like them kind and gentle to each other.

Dianne Brown-Green The Journey

111 Bear Street, Banff, Alberta, T1L 1A3, Canada

T: 1 403 762 2291   

E: info [at] whyte.org

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The Whyte Museum gratefully acknowledges the support of The Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation and the Alberta Foundation for the Arts

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